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Types of Small Guitars


Yes, they exist and yes, they’re very practical and essential to the guitar world! If you’re not familiar with small sized guitars or you’re snubbing your nose up at one, get off your high horse and be ready for a rude awakening!

Traveler Guitar

The traveler can’t necessarily be described to a T since they’re often sought after for custom specifications that cater to the traveling guitarist’s needs.

Although the neck and fretboard will remain consistent with a typical acoustic guitar, it’s the body shape that varies.

They can have strange, a-typical, and silent body shapes since they’re made to be compact, lightweight, and extremely portable.

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Mini Acoustic Guitar

mini acoustic guitar
1/2 Sized Classical Guitar 
If you’re traveling abroad and a traveler guitar is a little outlandish for you, you might want to consider a mini acoustic. All those who want to get their child a beginner guitar, the mini acoustic is an excellent gift!

They feature the same look and shape as a full-size dreadnought acoustic but they’re scaled down in size and frets.

Besides its convenient size for traveling, they’re also much easier to wield, reduces the learning barriers for beginner players, and the smaller fretboard is much more playable for smaller hands and fingers.

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Parlor Guitar

Parlor model guitars were a thing in the 1800s, especially in Europe. Back then, they were outfitted with nylon strings.

In the early part of the 1900s, early blues musicians actually made their signature with a parlor sized guitar.

While they never really hit the United States in popularity like they did in Europe, brands like Martin and Taylor are encouraging a come-back for the parlor guitars. They’re also making them more durable and putting on steel strings!

Blasphemy you say? Welcome to the resurgence!

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Tenor Guitar

Ah, the tenor isn’t your ordinary six string guitar, it has four.

While it’s more akin to the ukulele and played for its bright and twangy tones in folk music, its body is shaped more like a concert or orchestra acoustic guitar.

A tenor may be acoustic and/or electric, solid-bodied or resonator.

Interest in the tenor has increased in recent years.